The tranquil Chinese Garden also bursts into life during traditional Chinese festivals like Chinese New Year and the Mid-Autumn festival.

At the entrance of Chinese Garden, you’ll find a pair of majestic stone lions guarding its gates. Statues of these proud creatures have traditionally stood in front of imperial palaces, tombs and temples in ancient China for their mythical ability to protect.

Indeed the 13.5-hectare garden feels like a slice of ancient China transplanted to the west of Singapore, complete with a series of stone bridges, pagodas and a tea house.

Designed by Taiwanese architect Prof. Yuen-chen Yu and built in 1975, the space is modelled after the northern Chinese imperial style of architecture and landscaping, particularly during the Sung dynasty period. The ‘Bai Hong Qiao’ bridge, for instance, follows the style of the 17-Arch Bridge at the Summer Palace in Beijing. Other highlights include a Bonsai Garden, which houses a collection of over a hundred beautifully-manicured bonsais imported from Malaysia, China, Taiwan, Japan, Philippines, Indonesia, and Thailand.

Meanwhile, kids will delight at the Live Turtle And Tortoise Museum, which is home to more than 200 turtles and tortoises in over 60 different species.

The usually tranquil grounds burst into life during traditional Chinese festivals like Chinese New Year and the Mid-Autumn Festival.

A stroll through the meandering footpaths is a nice change of pace from the bustling city. And if you can’t get enough of the serenity of the Chinese Garden, simply cross over to the nearby Japanese Garden, a model of Japanese gardens from the middle ages.